A schmuck gets dressed

Just another corny #menswear tumblr
nickelsonwooster:

Summer style @jcrew #jcrewnyfw (at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week)

How nice is that poncho?




(Real nice)

nickelsonwooster:

Summer style @jcrew #jcrewnyfw (at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week)

How nice is that poncho?

(Real nice)

dirtyculture:

RRL

Limited-edition coat inspired by a World War II cold-weather tanker jacket. Made from specially developed indigo-dyed cotton canvas and designed with a light wax coating 

Praise

(via rrljunkie)

putthison:

Shorts: Acceptable When Paired with Mild Reluctance
Several otherwise respectable writers and publications have dipped their toes into menswear blogging recently, spurred by an ongoing debate on the propriety of shorts (aka “short pants”). In The New York Times, Jake Flanigin traces the argument to a 2011 interview in which Tom Ford assailed shorts and flip flops. Many would insist that certain climates demand shorts, but reasonable people disagree, including Andrew Exum, who made the flowchart above. (We’ve weighed in before, too.)
I own and wear shorts. Not to work. Not to anything that could be called an occasion. I am aware that I look better in other, longer leg coverings, because I’m an adult man and our legs look like they belong to a primate ancestor. But we make compromises for culture and comfort, and refusing to wear shorts on principle is the sort of rulebound thinking that makes people roll their eyes at rules. So: wear shorts. Fortunately, it’s September, and we can hide our hairy Neanderlegs comfortably until next June.
-Pete

putthison:

Shorts: Acceptable When Paired with Mild Reluctance

Several otherwise respectable writers and publications have dipped their toes into menswear blogging recently, spurred by an ongoing debate on the propriety of shorts (aka “short pants”). In The New York Times, Jake Flanigin traces the argument to a 2011 interview in which Tom Ford assailed shorts and flip flops. Many would insist that certain climates demand shorts, but reasonable people disagree, including Andrew Exum, who made the flowchart above. (We’ve weighed in before, too.)

I own and wear shorts. Not to work. Not to anything that could be called an occasion. I am aware that I look better in other, longer leg coverings, because I’m an adult man and our legs look like they belong to a primate ancestor. But we make compromises for culture and comfort, and refusing to wear shorts on principle is the sort of rulebound thinking that makes people roll their eyes at rules. So: wear shorts. Fortunately, it’s September, and we can hide our hairy Neanderlegs comfortably until next June.

-Pete

rawrdenim:

Indigo work wear jacket from @uniqlousa’s “Pure Blue Japan Project”. Don’t be fooled though as the collection has nothing to do with Pure Blue Japan.

Sheeeeeit.

rawrdenim:

Indigo work wear jacket from @uniqlousa’s “Pure Blue Japan Project”. Don’t be fooled though as the collection has nothing to do with Pure Blue Japan.

Sheeeeeit.

voxsart:

Tweed And Roll Neck Season Is Coming.
Steve McQueen, 1968.

Yooooo

voxsart:

Tweed And Roll Neck Season Is Coming.

Steve McQueen, 1968.

Yooooo

putthison:

If you grew up with suburban mooks universally wearing Abercrombie & Fitch, and headed to a high school today, you might be in for a surprise. The company has struggled in the recession years, and young people are turning towards brands like H&M. A&F is responding by taking their logos off their clothes, and presenting themselves as laid-back and sophisticated, rather than hyper-branded and luxuriously aspirational.
In fact, some are saying that young people are defining their social groups through clothing less than ever. Not sure if I’m buying it, but this is what Piper-Jaffrey analyst Steff Wissink told The New Yorker:

“Ten years ago, I could walk into an auditorium of two hundred kids, I could turn my back and tell them to switch seats and scramble.” Then, she said, she would turn around and guess which kids belonged to the same social groups according to what they were wearing—usually with great success. “Today,” she said, “it’s next to impossible.”

The real question: where are these auditoriums of 200 kids that are subject to the coldly capitalistic social experiments of retail analysts?
Anyway, it’s nice that Abercrombie is struggling.

putthison:

If you grew up with suburban mooks universally wearing Abercrombie & Fitch, and headed to a high school today, you might be in for a surprise. The company has struggled in the recession years, and young people are turning towards brands like H&M. A&F is responding by taking their logos off their clothes, and presenting themselves as laid-back and sophisticated, rather than hyper-branded and luxuriously aspirational.

In fact, some are saying that young people are defining their social groups through clothing less than ever. Not sure if I’m buying it, but this is what Piper-Jaffrey analyst Steff Wissink told The New Yorker:

“Ten years ago, I could walk into an auditorium of two hundred kids, I could turn my back and tell them to switch seats and scramble.” Then, she said, she would turn around and guess which kids belonged to the same social groups according to what they were wearing—usually with great success. “Today,” she said, “it’s next to impossible.”

The real question: where are these auditoriums of 200 kids that are subject to the coldly capitalistic social experiments of retail analysts?

Anyway, it’s nice that Abercrombie is struggling.